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1522954571 xiaoying zhu

Xiaoying Zhu, OD, PhD

Assistant Clinical Professor

Overview

Dr. Xiaoying Zhu is an optometrist and ophthalmologist with experience treating ocular disease. She has been an assistant clinical professor at SUNY Optometry since 2015. Previously Dr. Zhu served as an adjust assistant professor at the City University of New York and a research associate at the City University of New York’s Research Foundation. She was also an attending ophthalmologist at First Hospital at China Medical University.

Specialities

Pediatric Eye Care - Myopia Control

Ocular Disease

Clinical Research

Affiliations

Member of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology

Education

School of Psychology, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia, PhD, 2013–2017

New England College of Optometry, Boston, MA, OD, 2013–2015

Dept of Ophthalmology, the First Hospital, CMU, China, MS, 1995–1998

China Medical University (CMU), China, MD, 1987–1993

Residency

Biological and Vision Sciences, SUNY College of Optometry, 2015 – present
Assistant Clinical Professor, Lead Clinician, Myopia Control Clinic

Research Foundation of City University of New York, NY, NY, 1999 – 2013
Postdoctoral fellow / Research Associate

Dept. of Ophthalmology, First Hospital, China Medical University, 1993 – 1999
Ophthalmology Resident / Attending Ophthalmologist

   

Academic Honors and Awards

NIH Loan Repayment Program Award, 2016–2018

Fellow of the American Academy of Optometry (FAAO), 2016   

Australian Research Training Program Scholarship, 2013–2016  

     

Research

Research Description

As a clinician scientist, my principle research interest is in emmetropization, temporal integration of visual signals, and myopia control. I am currently conducting clinical trials to study the effect of contact lenses in slowing down myopia progression in school-aged children.

 

Emmetropization

I have been studying the visual input and possible signaling molecules regulating emmetropization and eye growth. During my early Postdoctoral Fellowship while working at the Research Foundation of City University of New York, my research (under the guidance of the late Josh Wallman) focused on the potency of myopic defocus in both inducing axial and choroidal compensation for positive lenses and preventing negative lens compensation using the chick model. This finding was widely cited in the scientific press and has been repeated in other species, e.g., tree shrews, rhesus monkeys, and guinea pigs. More importantly, it laid the foundation for developing clinical measures to prevent myopia progression in school-aged children, using Progressive Addition Lenses / Bifocal Lenses, Multifocal soft contact lenses, both of which originally designed to correct presbyopia, and Orthokeratology. In addition, I also investigated the potential signaling molecules controlling eye growth, and studied the effects of two antagonizing molecules, glucagon and insulin, in emmetropization and lens compensation. To locate the site of action for insulin, I developed a novel model, eye cup, to study the effects of insulin in various ocular tissue layers. The findings (glucagon and insulin prevent negative and positive lens compensation, respectively) have great potentials in developing pharmacological measures to prevent myopia. The eye cup model has been used by other laboratories. I also collaborated with Dr. Debora Nickla (at New England College of Optometry) to study the effects of muscarinic agents in eye growth.

 

Temporal Integration of Visual Signals

After discovering the potency of myopic defocus, I further explored the integration of visual signal in eye growth by investigating the temporal integration of myopic and hyperopic defocus, using the chick and marmoset models. My results show striking findings that both explain the potency of myopic defocus (the signal controlling axial inhibition after wearing positive lenses is very long lasting) and provide important clinical information in myopia prevention (taking frequent breaks during near work should help reduce myopia development). My findings have been repeated in guinea pigs and marmosets, and inspired the invention of multiple equipment (e.g., ClouClip) to look into temporal properties during near work in children.

 

Myopia Control

Orthokeratology and multifocal soft contact lenses have been shown to be efficacious in reducing myopia progression in school-aged children by superimposing myopic defocus (as a stop signal) in front of the peripheral retina. I am currently conducting clinical trials to study the effect of contact lenses in slowing down myopia progression in school-aged children.

 

Research Support

Australian Research Training Program Scholarship, 2013-2016

Schnurmacher Institute for Vision Research funding, 2018-present

 

Moderator/Organizer

  1. Session 352: Myopia I: Basics (2012), the Annual Meeting of The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL.
  2. Symposium 9: RPE—Choroidal— Scleral Signaling (2010), the 13th International Myopia Conference, Tubingen, Germany.
  3. Session 391: Ocular Growth Regulation: Biochemistry and Genetics (2009), the Annual Meeting of The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL.
  4. Session 460: Molecular/Genetic Mechanisms (2007), the Annual Meeting of The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL

Guest Lecturer

  1. Temporal integration of visual signals in lens compensation. New England College of Optometry, April 7, 2014
  2. Temporal integration of visual signals in lens compensation in chicks. New England College of Optometry, April 23, 2013
  3. Defocus and eye growth in chicks: Temporal properties and potential signaling molecules. City College of City University of New York, September, 2008

Peer Reviewed Papers

  1. Rucker, F., Zhu, X., McFadden, S., Troilo, D. Bitzer, M. and Schaeffel, F. (2014) Yoked and anti-yoked eye growth: Characteristics, causes and concerns. Submitted to Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci.
  2. Zhu, X. (2013) Temporal integration of visual signals in lens compensation (a review). Exp Eye Res. Sep;114:69-76.
  3. Sheng, C., Zhu, X., and Wallman, J. (2013) In vitro effects of insulin and RPE on choroidal and scleral components in eye growth. Exp Eye Res, Nov;116:439-48.
  4. Nickla, D. L., Zhu, X., and Wallman, J. (2013) Effects of muscarinic agents on chick choroids in intact eyes and eyecups: evidence for a muscarinic mechanism in choroidal thinning. Ophthalmic Physiol Opt. 33(3):245-56.
  5. Zhu, X., McBrien, N. A., Smith, E. L. 3rd, Troilo, D., and Wallman, J. (2013) Eyes in various species can shorten to compensate for myopic defocus. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 12;54(4):2634-44.
  6. Zhu, X. and Wallman, J. (2009) Temporal properties of compensation for positive and negative spectacle lenses in chicks. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 50(1):37-46.
  7. Zhu, X. and Wallman, J. (2009) Opposite effects of glucagon and insulin on compensation for spectacle lenses in chicks. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 50(1):24-36 Xiaoying Zhu, M.D., M.S., OD, Feb, 2016, Page 4 of 5 .

Publications

  1. Zhu, X., and McFadden, S.A. (2019) Chick eyes can recover from prior lens compensation without visual cues. Optometry and Vision Science, Aug:97(8):606-15.
  2. Sheng, C., Zhu, X., and Wallman, J. (2013) In vitro effects of insulin and RPE on choroidal and scleral components in eye growth. Exp Eye Res, Nov;116:439-48.
  3. Nickla, D. L., Zhu, X., and Wallman, J. (2013) Effects of muscarinic agents on chick choroids in intact eyes and eyecups: evidence for a muscarinic mechanism in choroidal thinning. Ophthalmic Physiol Opt. 33(3):245-56.
  4. Zhu, X. (2013) Temporal integration of visual signals in lens compensation (a review) Exp Eye Res. 114:69-76.
  5. Zhu, X., McBrien, N. A., Smith, E. L. 3rd, Troilo, D., and Wallman, J. (2013) Eyes in various species can shorten to compensate for myopic defocus. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci.12;54(4):2634-44.
  6. Zhu, X. and Wallman, J. (2009) Temporal properties of compensation for positive and negative spectacle lenses in chicks. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 50(1):37-46.
  7. Zhu, X. and Wallman, J. (2009) Opposite effects of glucagon and insulin on compensation for spectacle lenses in chicks. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 50(1):24-36.
  8. Zhu, X., Park, T. W., Winawer, J.A. and Wallman, J. (2005) In a matter of minutes the eye can know which way to grow. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 46(7): 2238-41.
  9. Winawer, J. A., Zhu, X., Choi, J. and Wallman, J (2005). Ocular compensation for alternating myopic and hyperopic defocus. Vision Res 45(13): 1667-77.
  10. Zhu, X., Winawer, J. A., and Wallman, J. (2003) Potency of myopic defocus in spectacle lens compensation. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 44(7): 2818-27.
  11. Xu, Y., Liu, H. Niu, T. and Zhu, X. (2000) Long-term observation of curative effects of posterior scleral reinforcement surgery in patients with juvenile progressive myopia. Chin J Ophthalmol 36(6):455-8.
  12. Xu, Y., Xu, J., Li, Y., Wang, Z. and Zhu, X. (2000) Clinical analysis for the relative accommodative capabilities of the eyes of undergraduate students with normal vision. JChin Med Univ 29(5):389-90.
  13. Zhu, X. and Xu, Y. (1999) The morphological study of form deprivation myopia in chicks. Chinese Journal of Practical Ophthalmology 17(1):26-30.
  14. Xu, Y., Su, Y. and Zhu, X. (1998) A case report of systematic multiple chondroma followed by an orbit tumor. Chin J Ophthalmol 34(3):193.

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